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IAM 2.0 – Identity and Asset Management in the IoT

Defining and managing device identity in the constantly evolving IoT ecosystem has become one of the top priorities for IoT vendors. Traditional Identity and Access Management (IAM) principles are not equipped to deal with this challenge which calls for a massive overhaul and a plethora of novel architecture, connectivity and security considerations to be taken into account.

ABI Research has investigated these multifaceted challenges and proposes an ‘IAM 2.0’ model which outlines all aforementioned considerations in the form of an IoT ID guide for prospective implementers. The report provides in-depth analyses and considerations which greatly expand upon traditional IAM and deal with the influx of users’ digital identities, cloud services, platforms and devices from a wide spectrum of communication protocols, data governance issues, public key infrastructure, IP migration, security specifications and managing of digital certificates, among others. This report also features a blueprint for defining the future of IoT Identity by going past traditional ID definitions and proposing a future-looking, holistic approach encompassing everything from APIs, MFA, middleware and cloud platforms to behavioral analytics, cryptography, machine learning, and automation.

Table of Contents

  • 1. EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW
  • 2. THE EVOLUTION TOWARDS IAM 2.0
    • 2.1. Defining IAM 2.0
    • 2.2. Enabling the Identities of Tomorrow: IAM 2.0 Considerations
    • 2.3. Guidelines to Merge IoT Identity Management and Security
    • 2.4. Certificate-Specific Considerations for the IoT
  • 3. A FUTURE-LOOKING APPROACH FOR DEFINING THING IDENTITY
    • 3.1. Inherited Attributes
    • 3.2. Operational Attributes
    • 3.3. Managed Attributes
    • 3.4. Behavioral Attributes
    • 3.5. Peripheral Attributes
  • 4. STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS: IP SUPPORT, PROTOCOLS, ARCHITECTURE, AND SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS
    • 4.1. Architecture Considerations
    • 4.2. Standardization Considerations
    • 4.3. User Identity Considerations
    • 4.4. Biometrics and MFA Considerations
    • 4.5. Device Identity Considerations
    • 4.6. Legacy or Transitional Considerations
    • 4.7. Communication Protocol Considerations
    • 4.8. IP-Based Considerations