Dylan Khoo

Dylan Khoo

Industry Analyst

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Topics Covered

Automotive Over-the-Air Software Updates
BYD Overtakes Tesla, Presenting a Growing Threat to Legacy OEMs

Dylan Khoo In The News

The Canadian Press (2024-02-11)
"Software isn't really an option anymore for automakers; it's mandatory," said Dylan Khoo, an automotive industry analyst with ABI Research, based in London, England. "You have to have software in the vehicle and software has bugs inherent to it," he said. "With that software will come the requirement to update it and if you can't do that remotely, it's heavily limiting." Remote upgrades work similarly to changesfor connected devices such as mobile phones or laptops in that they can be programmed for certain times, typically overnight, and be delivered without the user having to actively participate, said Khoo.
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Business Insider (2024-02-03)
"From a purely technological point of view, it is the panacea. It solves all of the big problems people have with EVs," said Dylan Khoo, an analyst at ABI Research. He pointed out that the most powerful plug-in battery chargers still take 20 minutes to charge an EV up to 80%, with many battery swap stations able to swap in a fully charged battery under five.
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The Boston Globe (2024-02-02)
Dylan Khoo, an automotive analyst for ABI Research, said today’s higher cost of capital is a big reason Aptiv and other companies are backing off. “There was a period for about 10 years when money was really cheap to get,” Khoo said. But since the Federal Reserve raised rates to fight inflation, “it’s harder to get loans and get money these days.” Meanwhile, said Khoo, today’s self-driving taxi services require constant oversight, including workers who can come to the rescue when a vehicle goes wrong. The extra cost makes them very unprofitable. “If you can’t get it fully to work, it’s not viable at all,” Khoo said.
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The Post and Courier (2023-11-26)
According to figures compiled by ABI Research, a market intelligence company that specializes in EVs, a family’s decision to replace two traditional gas-powered vehicles with EVs will increase their daily household energy usage by an average of 74 percent. Still, that doesn’t necessarily mean the situation is dire. And simple math, ABI Research’s Dylan Khoo tells The Post and Courier, proves it. “EVs make up just 1.2 percent of cars across the U.S. and won’t reach a 100 percent share for a few decades,” Khoo wrote in an email. “At ABI Research, we expect EVs (not including plug-in hybrids) to make up under 10 percent of vehicles in the U.S. by 2030. An 11 percent increase in statewide electricity consumption then is not insignificant, but it is something that can be reasonably accommodated over a time span of 30 years or so.”
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Batteries News (2023-09-28)
“The most important technologies are, therefore, those that make batteries cheaper or easier to manufacture at scale. Revolutionary technologies such as solid-state batteries promise improved ranges and reduced charging times, generating much media attention, but are too expensive and difficult to manufacture. Battery developments this decade will focus on evolutionary improvements on current lithium-ion batteries,”
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EE Times Asia (2023-09-27)
“Battery cost and production volume are the key barriers to adoption for EVs. The most important technologies are, therefore, those that make batteries cheaper or easier to manufacture at scale. Revolutionary technologies such as solid-state batteries promise improved ranges and reduced charging times, generating much media attention, but are too expensive and difficult to manufacture. Battery developments this decade will focus on evolutionary improvements on current lithium-ion batteries,” said Dylan Khoo, Electric Vehicles Industry Analyst at ABI Research.
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Electronics Media (2023-09-26)
“Battery cost and production volume are the key barriers to adoption for EVs. The most important technologies are, therefore, those that make batteries cheaper or easier to manufacture at scale. Revolutionary technologies such as solid-state batteries promise improved ranges and reduced charging times, generating much media attention, but are too expensive and difficult to manufacture. Battery developments this decade will focus on evolutionary improvements on current lithium-ion batteries,” says Dylan Khoo, Electric Vehicles Industry Analyst at ABI Research.
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GreenTechLead (2023-09-26)
“There are EVs with long ranges and EVs that can charge quickly, but there are no EVs that cost the same as their fossil fuel counterparts. Evolutionary improvements over current lithium-ion battery technology will be essential to reduce the cost of EVs and achieve industrywide electrification targets,” Dylan Khoo, Electric Vehicles Industry Analyst at ABI Research, said.
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CNN (2023-09-08)
“Overcapacity, economic slowdown, and the highly competitive automotive market at home are making Chinese [carmakers] look overseas for sales,” said Dylan Khoo, an EV industry analyst at New York-based ABI Research. “In Europe, they see a lucrative market with a great demand for EVs and few protectionist measures.”
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After Market News (2023-08-25)
Dylan Khoo, industry analyst at ABI Research, says, “Local OEMs are still finding their feet with electrification. These Chinese disruptors are more experienced and entirely focused on EVs. They offer European customers BEVs that are competitive in price and quality across various segments. Chinese-owned brands such as MG and Polestar have already been in the market for a while, and their models imported from China are selling well.”
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ATN (2023-08-24)
A July 2023 report published by global technology intelligence firm ABI Research estimates that there will be 1.2 million Chinese-manufactured battery electric vehicles (BEV) imported by the European Union (EU) by 2030. As of May 2023, BEVs account for 24 per cent of all car sales in China. With Chinese companies holding an estimated 56 per cent of the market share for battery manufacturing, the nation’s influence on the industry will only continue to grow. Dylan Khoo, Industry Analyst at ABI Research, believes that this focus in comparison to European manufacturers will lead to greater import of Chinese BEVs.
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Canadian Auto Dealer (2023-08-24)
“Local OEMs are still finding their feet with electrification, these Chinese disruptors are more experienced and entirely focused on EVs,” said Dylan Khoo, Industry Analyst at ABI Research, in a statement. “They offer European customers BEVs that are competitive in price and quality across various segments.”
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Future Car (2023-08-23)
In China, BEVs already account for 24% of all car sales as of May 2023. With Chinese companies holding a 56% market share in battery manufacturing, their influence on the industry is set to continue growing. Dylan Khoo, an Industry Analyst at ABI Research, believes that the experience and focus of Chinese manufacturers on EVs will lead to a greater import of Chinese BEVs compared to European manufacturers.
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ee News (2023-08-09)
Using intelligent BMS software could save a total of $76bn cumulatively from 2024 by reducing the size of Electric Vehicle (EV) batteries without reducing their range. This reduces the cost to OEMs of manufacturing EVs, helping them to mitigate the effects of limited battery production and achieve profitability says ABI. “OEMs are struggling with two competing issues: the demand from customers for EVs with a greater driving range and the shortages of EV batteries due to restricted supplies of critical minerals and limited manufacturing capacity. Advanced BMS software allows EV batteries to be charged to a higher level and discharged to a lower level without being damaged or aging prematurely, increasing their usable capacity and addressing both problems. These solutions can be adopted purely through software, running as AUTOSAR applications to augment the existing BMS capabilities,” says Dylan Khoo, Electric Vehicles Analyst at ABI Research.
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American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2023-08-09)
While sodium-ion batteries offer a host of advantages, they also present challenges. Substituting sodium for lithium might lead to compatible chemistries but because sodium is three times heavier and has a lower redox potential, it packs less energy. “LFP (lithium iron phosphate) cells get about 160 W/kg, the current generation of sodium does about 140,” said Dylan Khoo, industry analyst at ABI Research, a technology intelligence firm.
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TechBrew (2023-08-04)
Meeting that demand will require coordinated work and technology to make grids more efficient, if not the expansion of capacity outright, according to Dylan Khoo, an industry analyst at ABI Research. “You’re going to see, at the household level, one of the main consumers of electricity is going to be electric vehicles,” Khoo told Tech Brew. “Increasing the resilience of the grid is going to be accomplished through making it more intelligent in a big way—not necessarily through many infrastructure upgrades, depending on location. But a lot of it is just going to be around making sure that the demand and the generation can tie up closely and at the right times.”
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Batteries News (2023-07-23)
Dylan Khoo, Electric Vehicles Analyst at ABI Research, said: “Advanced BMS software allows EV batteries to be charged to a higher level and discharged to a lower level without being damaged or aging prematurely, increasing their usable capacity and addressing both problems. These solutions can be adopted purely through software, running as AUTOSAR applications to augment the existing BMS capabilities.”
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BISinfotech (2023-07-21)
“OEMs are struggling with two competing issues: the demand from customers for EVs with a greater dri... Read more at: https://www.evmechanica.com/bms-software-to-help-automakers-save-18-bn-in-2030/
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Motor (2023-05-10)
Dylan Khoo, Smart Mobility & Automotive Analyst at ABI Research, commented on the matter: “Vehicle recalls due to faulty software are becoming more common as software grows in complexity and becomes more deeply integrated into safety-critical functions. In 2022, nearly 10 million cars were recalled in the United States due to software-related issues, with nearly half of these requiring the software to be updated by a car dealer. These recalls will continue to become more prevalent as cars transition toward software-defined vehicles (SDVs), so the capability to remotely repair faulty software without the cost or inconvenience to the customer of in-person updates will be essential for OEMs.”
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ABC News (2023-05-10)
Interview with Dylan Khoo
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Repairer Driven News (2023-05-09)
ABI Research predicts that by 2028 U.S. automakers will shift to over-the-air (OTA) recall remedies to save $1.5 billion a year. According to the global technology intelligence firm’s latest research, performing software updates in person costs OEMs $500 million annually. “Vehicle recalls due to faulty software are becoming more common as software grows in complexity and becomes more deeply integrated into safety-critical functions,” said Dylan Khoo, ABI Research smart mobility & automotive analyst. “In 2022, nearly 10 million cars were recalled in the United States due to software-related issues, with nearly half of these requiring the software to be updated by a car dealer. These recalls will continue to become more prevalent as cars transition toward software-defined vehicles (SDVs), so the capability to remotely repair faulty software without the cost or inconvenience to the customer of in-person updates will be essential for OEMs.”
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Canadian Auto Dealer (2023-05-05)
A new report from ABI Research found that, by 2028, automakers in the United States will use Over-the-Air (OTA) updates to remotely implement fixes to recalled vehicles, saving them US$1.5 billion in the process. According to the firm, OEMs currently spend half a billion dollars annually to perform these software updates in-person. Doing them through OTA capabilities would be cheaper and likely faster. “Vehicle recalls due to faulty software are becoming more common as software grows in complexity and becomes more deeply integrated into safety-critical functions,” said Dylan Khoo, Smart Mobility & Automotive Analyst at ABI Research, in a statement.
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Telsarati (2023-05-05)
Tesla and other automakers that use Over-the-Air updates to update and improve their vehicles and even solve recalls are expected to save roughly $1.5 billion by 2028, new research from global technology intelligence firm ABI states. ABI recognized Tesla as the “leader in this space” and notes that the company “has never required an in-person software update” to solve a vehicle recall. Tesla has routinely fixed issues with its cars, remedying everything from faulty rear-view cameras to tail light issues, with OTA updates that are downloadable with an internet connection and applied, in some instances, while drivers are asleep.
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Green Car Congress (2023-05-04)
By 2028, automakers in the United States will use Over-the-Air (OTA) update capabilities to save US$1.5 billion by remotely implementing fixes to product recalls. According to global technology intelligence firm ABI Research, performing these legally required software updates in-person costs OEMs half a billion dollars annually. Vehicle recalls due to faulty software are becoming more common as software grows in complexity and becomes more deeply integrated into safety-critical functions. In 2022, nearly 10 million cars were recalled in the United States due to software-related issues, with nearly half of these requiring the software to be updated by a car dealer. These recalls will continue to become more prevalent as cars transition toward software-defined vehicles (SDVs), so the capability to remotely repair faulty software without the cost or inconvenience to the customer of in-person updates will be essential for OEMs. —Dylan Khoo, Smart Mobility & Automotive Analyst at ABI Research
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CIO Tech Asia (2023-05-04)
OTA updates to save automation industry $US1.5 billion FacebookTwitterLinkedin By CIO Tech Team | May 4, 2023 The ability to remotely update faulty software in vehicles will be a key asset By 2028, automakers in the United States will use Over-the-Air (OTA) update capabilities to save $US1.5 billion by remotely implementing fixes to product recalls. According to global technology intelligence firm ABI Research, performing these legally required software updates in-person costs OEMs half a billion dollars annually. “Vehicle recalls due to faulty software are becoming more common as software grows in complexity and becomes more deeply integrated into safety-critical functions,” says Dylan Khoo, Smart Mobility & Automotive Analyst at ABI Research. “In 2022, nearly 10 million cars were recalled in the United States due to software-related issues, with nearly half of these requiring the software to be updated by a car dealer. These recalls will continue to become more prevalent as cars transition toward software-defined vehicles (SDVs), so the capability to remotely repair faulty software without the cost or inconvenience to the customer of in-person updates will be essential for OEMs.”
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CNN (2023-04-12)
But Dylan Khoo, an analyst at tech intelligence firm ABI Research, previously told CNN that electric bikes and scooters use batteries which can be around 50 times larger than the one in a smartphone. “So when a fire does happen, it’s much more dangerous,” Khoo said. All lithium-ion batteries use flammable materials, and incidents are likely the result of “thermal runaway,” a chain reaction which can lead to a fire or catastrophic explosion, according to Khoo. “This process can be triggered by a battery overheating, being punctured, or an electrical fault like a short circuit,” Khoo said. “In cases where fires occur spontaneously while charging, it is likely due to manufacturing defects.”
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Canadian Auto Dealer (2023-03-13)
To help governments and industry in achieving these goals, ABI Research has launched a new Electric Vehicle research service to provide automotive industry players, innovators, and suppliers with actionable research and strategic guidance to tap into this rapidly expanding industry.
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Assembly Magazine (2023-03-10)
The road to future electric vehicle dominance faces many road bumps during the decade ahead, warns ABI Research. The industry is faced with numerous deadlines looming around the world to ban new sales of ICE vehicles. Forecasts have predicted up to 45 million EVs produced by 2030 and 71 million by 2035.
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CNN (2023-03-09)
Dylan Khoo, an analyst at tech intelligence firm ABI Research, said electric bikes and scooters use batteries which can be around 50 times larger than the one in a smartphone. “So when a fire does happen, it’s much more dangerous,” Khoo said. All lithium-ion batteries use flammable materials, and incidents such as the one in the Bronx are likely the result of “thermal runaway,” a chain reaction which can lead to a fire or catastrophic explosion, according to Khoo. “This process can be triggered by a battery overheating, being punctured, or an electrical fault like a short circuit,” Khoo said. “In cases where fires occur spontaneously while charging, it is likely due to manufacturing defects.”
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