The Future of Active vs Passive DAS, Repeaters, and Threat from Small Cells Image

The Future of Active vs Passive DAS, Repeaters, and Threat from Small Cells

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In-building wireless coverage has always been dominated by distributed antenna systems (DAS) but in recent years small cells have started to penetrate the lower end building segments. Are small cells likely to break into the medium and larger building segments, either as a standalone solution or as a feeder for DAS solutions? How does this impact the existing repeater market, majority of which is feeding into DAS systems? How does the threat from small cells impact passive DAS systems vs active DAS systems? With the growing call for heterogeneous networks meant to multiply layers of cells providing dynamic capacity and coverage both indoors and outdoors, which technology is likely to win amongst DAS, repeaters and small cells?

Table of Contents

  • 1. ACTIVE DAS GAINING TRACTION WHILE PASSIVE REGIONAL STRONGHOLDS STILL REMAIN
    • 1.1. Active DAS Brings Flexibility, Scalability and Better Small Cell Integration
    • 1.2. Passive DAS Continues to Have Regional Strongholds
  • 2. WILL SMALL CELLS EAT THE DAS AND REPEATER PIE?
    • 2.1. Small Cells Gaining Traction
    • 2.2. Comparison of Small Cells and DAS
      • 2.2.1. Indoor Public Access Small Cells
      • 2.2.2. Small Cells as DAS Feeders
    • 2.3. Challenges of Cluster Small Cell Deployment
  • 3. INNOVATION IS THE NAME OF THE GAME AS INCUMBENTS FIGHT THREAT FROM UPCOMING VENDORS
    • 3.1. DAS Vendors Converging around Active DAS
    • 3.2. Small and Medium Sized DAS Vendors Bring Next Wave of Innovation
    • 3.3. Innovation Isn't Enough to Survive in DAS Market

Charts

  1. Active vs. Passive DAS - Global System Revenues, Forecast 2011 to 2017
  2. Active vs. Passive - North America and Outside North America, Forecast 2011 to 2017
  3. Equipment Revenues - DAS, Repeaters, and Enterprise Small Cells, Global Forecast, 2011 to 2017
  4. DAS Feeder Distribution - BTS, Repeaters, and Small Cells, Global Forecast, 2017