Mobile Augmented Reality Image

Mobile Augmented Reality

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Augmented Reality (AR) is a term used to describe the use of technology to superimpose images, data or other content over a displayed real life view of the world. Most applications for AR have been either industrial/military or home computer-based. But recently, innovative technologists and developers have untethered AR by leveraging mobile networks and, as a primary device, smartphones. This shift into the mobile use of AR radically changes the paradigm of AR and propels AR far beyond the capacity, possibilities and opportunities of tethered uses. Mobile AR will expand rapidly, driven by smartphone apps, then even more rapidly as developers take advantage of AR platforms/engines that enable them to embed AR functionality into the broad base of smartphone apps. This study examines the drivers and barriers involved in mobile AR, identifies key opportunities for potential players and outlines the core business cases. Critical forecasts include revenue and app downloads.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

  • Executive Brief: Top-Line Forecast
  • 1. Executive Summary
    • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.1.1. Defining Mobile AR
      • 1.1.2. Today's Mobile AR
      • 1.1.3. Tomorrow's Mobile AR - Zero Click Interface, the Internet of Things
    • 1.2. Drivers
    • 1.3. Barriers
    • 1.4. Anatomy
      • 1.4.1. Marker-Based AR
      • 1.4.2. Marker-less AR
      • 1.4.3. Image Recognition
      • 1.4.4. Cloud-Based Storage
      • 1.4.5. Smartphones
      • 1.4.6. Media Tablets
      • 1.4.7. Handheld Gaming Devices
      • 1.4.8. Eyewear
    • 1.5. Market Development
      • 1.5.1. AR Platforms/World Browsers
      • 1.5.2. The Future's Prevailing App Categories
      • 1.5.3. Physically Impaired
      • 1.5.4. Facial, Voice, and Gesture Recognition
      • 1.5.5. Migrating from Pull to Push AR
      • 1.5.6. The Internet of Things
      • 1.5.7. Situational Awareness
    • 1.6. Market Forecasts
  • 2. Conclusions and Recommendations
    • 2.1. Conclusions
    • 2.2. Recommendations
  • 3. Market Anatomy/Technology
    • 3.1. Defining Augmented Reality
    • 3.2. AR as a Visual Medium
    • 3.3. Graphics Superimposed on Real-Time Video
      • 3.3.1. Graphics Superimposed on a Transparent Medium
    • 3.4. Mobile Advantage - Sensors
      • 3.4.1. Accelerometer
      • 3.4.2. Gyroscope
      • 3.4.3. Digital Compass (Magnetometer)
    • 3.5. Computer Vision
    • 3.6. Marker-Based AR
      • 3.6.1. Public Infrastructure for Marker-Based AR - Pachube Porthole
      • 3.6.2. Point and Shoot Tagging
    • 3.7. Marker-Less AR
      • 3.7.1. Sensor Fusion
      • 3.7.2. Image Recognition
      • 3.7.3. Cloud-Based Storage
        • 3.7.3.1. Google Goggles and Image-Based Search
        • 3.7.3.2. Intel
      • 3.7.4. Facial Recognition
        • 3.7.4.1. Recognizr
        • 3.7.4.2. ACCESS
    • 3.8. Other AR Platforms, Enablers
      • 3.8.1. metaio's Junaio Glue
      • 3.8.2. Qualcomm
      • 3.8.3. Alcatel-Lucent Dekaps
    • 3.9. Devices
      • 3.9.1. Smartphones
      • 3.9.2. Media Tablets
      • 3.9.3. Mobile Gaming Devices, Other Consumer Electronics
        • 3.9.3.1. Handheld Games
      • 3.9.4. Eyewear
  • 4. Market Development
    • 4.1. Current Landscape
    • 4.2. Smartphone Apps
      • 4.2.1. Overview
      • 4.2.2. Smartphone OS
      • 4.2.3. AR Platforms/World Browsers
        • 4.2.3.1. Layar
        • 4.2.3.2. metaio
        • 4.2.3.3. Mobilizy (Wikitude)
        • 4.2.3.4. Kamra
        • 4.2.3.5. mixare
        • 4.2.3.6. Will Apple, Google, and RIM Build AR Engines?
      • 4.2.4. The Future's Prevailing App Categories
        • 4.2.4.1. Proximity-Based Social Networking
        • 4.2.4.2. ARstreets
        • 4.2.4.3. Tonchidot, Sekai Camera
        • 4.2.4.4. Marketing
        • 4.2.4.5. Navigation
        • 4.2.4.6. acrossair's Nearest Tube
        • 4.2.4.7. Real-Time Search - Google Goggles
        • 4.2.4.8. Games
        • 4.2.4.9. Shopping
        • 4.2.4.10. Tryvertising
        • 4.2.4.11. Tesco Wine Finder
        • 4.2.4.12. Total Immersion's Fitting Room for Glasses
        • 4.2.4.13. IKEA Product Catalog
    • 4.3. Future
      • 4.3.1. Physically Impaired
      • 4.3.2. Evolution of Games
      • 4.3.3. Facial, Voice, and Gesture Recognition
      • 4.3.4. Migrating from Pull to Push AR
      • 4.3.5. Eyewear
      • 4.3.6. The Internet of Things
      • 4.3.7. Situational Awareness
      • 4.3.8. Zero-Click Interface
  • 5. Market Forecasts
    • 5.1. Forecast Methodology
      • 5.1.1. Handheld AR Game Sales & Revenue
      • 5.1.2. Mobile AR Applications Downloads
      • 5.1.3. Mobile AR Application Revenue, Paid Apps
      • 5.1.4. Mobile AR Application Revenue, In-App Purchases
      • 5.1.5. Mobile AR Application Revenue; In-App Advertising
    • 5.2. Market Forecasts
      • 5.2.1. Handheld AR Game Sales & Revenue
      • 5.2.2. Mobile AR Applications Downloads
      • 5.2.3. Mobile AR Application Revenue, Paid Apps
      • 5.2.4. Mobile AR Application Revenue, In-App Purchases
      • 5.2.5. Mobile AR Application Revenue; In-App Advertising
  • 6. Company Directory
  • 7. Acronyms

Charts

  1. Mobile AR Revenue by Sector, World Market Forecast: 2010 to 2016
  2. Mobile AR Application Downloads by OS World Market Forecast: 2010 to 2016
  3. Mobile AR Revenue by Sector
  4. Handheld AR Game Sales by Region
  5. Handheld AR Game Revenues by Region
  6. Smartphone Installed Base by OS
  7. Mobile AR Application Downloads by OS
  8. Mobile AR Application Downloads Revenue, Paid Apps by OS
  9. Mobile AR Application Revenue, In-App Purchases

Figures

  1. Marker-Based App AR Girl
  2. Porthole
  3. Layar World Browser
  4. Wikitude World Browser
  5. KHARMA
  6. Facebook for Android
  7. ARstreets
  8. Sekai Camera screenshots
  9. acrossair Nearest Tube App
  10. AR Soccer