Smart Grid Applications

Most of the electric utility infrastructure deployed in the industrialized world was built between 60 to 80 years ago, and was designed to provide customers with as much energy as they could consume, generated from a centralized fossil fuel plant. However, much of the infrastructure is antiquated, and with the continuing increase in demand for power, the grid cannot safely and reliably manage the loads of today and tomorrow without significant upgrades. Furthermore, climate change standards and renewable energy mandates are among the key drivers that are forcing utilities to upgrades their infrastructure to incorporate new generation sources that do not negatively impact the environment. In order to accommodate these renewable sources of energy, which usually produce power on an intermittent basis, utilities are needing to install more accurate measurement, monitoring, control and analysis equipment to ensure these energy sources can be properly and reliably integrated into the grid. These intelligent technological and communication enhancements are usually described as the smart grid. This study covers the market for smart grid equipment and services for the 2010-2015 period, covering North America, Europe, the Asia-Pacific region, and selected other countries in the rest of the world. It provides the outlook for smart meter installations, as well as the spending associated with them. It also examines and forecasts spending on smart grid-related transmission and distribution (T&D) infrastructure, as well as implementation of specific smart grid-related components at the utility level, such as synchrophasors and HAN communication chipsets.

Table of Contents

  • Executive Brief: Top-Line Forecast
  • 1. Executive Summary
    • 1.1. What Is a Smart Grid?
    • 1.2. The Need for a Smart Grid
    • 1.3. Requirements for a Smart Grid
    • 1.4. Smart Grid Technologies
    • 1.5. Smart Grid Drivers
    • 1.6. Smart Grid Market Forecasts
  • 2. Technology Overview
    • 2.1. Smart Grid Components
    • 2.2. Communications Technology
      • 2.2.1. Home Area Networking Technologies
    • 2.3. Neighborhood and Wide Area Networking Technologies
      • 2.3.1. RF Mesh Networks
      • 2.3.2. WiMAX
      • 2.3.3. Power Line Communications
    • 2.4. Additional Smart Grid-Enabling Standards
      • 2.4.1. 6loWPAN
      • 2.4.2. Wireless M-Bus
      • 2.4.3. U-SNAP and the Universal Metering Interface
    • 2.5. Residential Energy Equipment
      • 2.5.1. Smart Appliances
      • 2.5.2. Data Monitors/Data Management Software
      • 2.5.3. Smart Meters
      • 2.5.4. Data Output to Home Monitors or Control Devices
      • 2.5.5. Data Output to Utilities
    • 2.6. Advanced Energy Management Systems
      • 2.6.1. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)
      • 2.6.2. Distribution Management System (DMS)
      • 2.6.3. Outage Management System (OMS)
      • 2.6.4. Meter Data Management System (MDMS)
    • 2.7. Advanced Transmission and Distribution Components
      • 2.7.1. On-Line Reclosers
      • 2.7.2. Capacitor Controls
      • 2.7.3. Voltage Regulators
      • 2.7.4. Load Break Switches
      • 2.7.5. IED Protection Relays
      • 2.7.6. Power Quality Monitors
      • 2.7.7. Synchrophasors
      • 2.7.8. Current Transformers
      • 2.7.9. Rogowski Coils
      • 2.7.10. Shunt Resistors
    • 2.8. Advanced Asset Management
      • 2.8.1. Dynamic Pricing
      • 2.8.2. Distribution Automation
      • 2.8.3. Demand-Response Programs
    • 2.9. Key Disruptive Technologies
      • 2.9.1. Plug-In Vehicles
      • 2.9.2. Widespread Private Distributed Generation
      • 2.9.3. Energy Storage Technologies
  • 3. Business and Regulatory Issues
    • 3.1. Rationale for the Smart Grid
    • 3.2. Smart Grid Market Business Issues
      • 3.2.1. Energy Efficiency Mandates
      • 3.2.2. Utility Business Model Changes
      • 3.2.3. Smart Grid Interoperability Standards
      • 3.2.4. Network and Physical Security
      • 3.2.5. Privacy
      • 3.2.6. Pricing Models and Consumer Behavior
    • 3.3. Issues and Activities by Region
      • 3.3.1. North America
      • 3.3.2. Europe Smart Grid Market
      • 3.3.3. Rest of World Smart Grid Developments, Initiatives, and Deployments
      • 3.3.4. Global Outlook
  • 4. Market Outlook and Forecasts
    • 4.1. Forecast Methodology
    • 4.2. Smart Grid Market Forecasts
    • 4.3. Electricity Generation, Demand Response, and Storage Forecasts
    • 4.4. Selected Smart Grid Component Forecasts
  • 5. Company Profiles
    • 5.1. Utilities/Grid Operators
      • 5.1.1. American Electric Power
      • 5.1.2. Austin Energy
      • 5.1.3. Consolidated Edison
      • 5.1.4. Duke Energy Corp
      • 5.1.5. E.ON
      • 5.1.6. EDF Energy
      • 5.1.7. Enel SpA
      • 5.1.8. Florida Power & Light Company
      • 5.1.9. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator
      • 5.1.10. Pacific Gas and Electric Company
      • 5.1.11. Pepco
      • 5.1.12. Southern California Edison
      • 5.1.13. Xcel Energy
    • 5.2. Advanced Metering and Networking Companies
      • 5.2.1. Echelon Corp
      • 5.2.2. Elster Solutions
      • 5.2.3. GE Energy
      • 5.2.4. Itron Inc
      • 5.2.5. Landis+Gyr
      • 5.2.6. Sensus
    • 5.3. Networking, Communications, and Technology Firms
      • 5.3.1. Arch Rock Corp
      • 5.3.2. Cisco Systems
      • 5.3.3. Silver Spring Networks
      • 5.3.4. SmartSynch
      • 5.3.5. Trilliant Inc
    • 5.4. Software, Applications Providers, Integrators
      • 5.4.1. Aclara
      • 5.4.2. Grid Net
      • 5.4.3. GridPoint Inc
      • 5.4.4. Ecologic Analytics LLC
      • 5.4.5. eMeter, Inc
      • 5.4.6. IBM Corp
    • 5.5. Grid Optimization & Distribution Automation
      • 5.5.1. ABB
      • 5.5.2. Comverge
      • 5.5.3. EnerNOC
      • 5.5.4. S&C Electric Company
    • 5.6. Home Area Networking Vendors
      • 5.6.1. Google
      • 5.6.2. Microsoft Corp
      • 5.6.3. Onzo Ltd
      • 5.6.4. Tendril
  • 6. Industry Directory
  • 7. Acronyms

Charts

  1. Smart Meter Installed Base World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  2. Smart Meter Cumulative Spending World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  3. Smart Meter Installed Base, World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  4. Smart Meter Cumulative Spending, World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  5. T&D Cumulative Infrastructure Spending, World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  6. Smart Grid Cumulative CAPEX Spending, World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015
  7. Cumulative Smart Meter Spending vs. T&D Spending, World Market, Forecast: 2010 to 2015

Figures

  1. Diagram of a Smart Grid
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Research Information

Price
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Publish Date
3Q 2010
Code
RR-GRID-10
Research Type
Report
Pages
95